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Job-seekers, there’s good news and bad news. The good news is,the healthcare industry is expected to generate more than 15million new jobs over the next decade, according to the U.S.Department of Labor. The bad news is, most of them will pay lessthan $30,000 a year.

As you might expect, top-paying jobs – such as registerednurses, educators, accountants and administrators – will require anadvanced degree. To compete for higher-paying careers, experts say,tomorrow’s job-hunters will need even more education.

But once you’ve secured your bachelor’s degree and specializedtraining, what more can you do to set yourself apart? Find anMBA program and get amaster’s in business administration.

The more education you have, the less likely you are to beunemployed, according to Labor Department statistics. High schoolgraduates have an unemployment rate of 10.3 percent. For peoplewith some college education that rate drops to 8.7 percent. And forthose with a bachelor’s or a more advanced degree, the unemploymentrate is just 4.6 percent. Federal statistics also show that peoplewith advanced degrees earn significantly more money than those withno degrees.

MBAs are not just for people seeking finance or administrativejobs anymore. A broader range of professionals and recent graduatesare finding an MBA can help advance their careers. They’re flockingto schools like Daniels College of Business, a 100-year-oldinstitution in Colorado that ranked third in the world for smallMBA programs in 2009. Its part-time MBA programs have won nationaland international acclaim.

In the health care industry especially, competition willcontinue to be fierce for top-paying jobs, and an MBA can give ajob candidate the extra edge he or she needs. Many health careindustry executives already have MBAs. For example, Dr. David E.Dangerfield, CEO of Avalon Health Care Group, an elder care provider, has both MBAand doctoral degrees.

Many employers view an MBA as evidence that a job candidate hasmanagerial and administrative skills that can apply to a wide rangeof industries. Plus, it also shows the potential employee has thecommitment, discipline and intelligence required to complete arigorous MBA program – skills that appeal to employers in everyindustry.

Competition for jobs that require an MBA may also be heating up,as some professions – like insurance underwriter, facilitiesmanager and economist – are actually expected to shed jobs over thenext decade. MBA holders out of work in industries traditionallyassociated with the degree will be looking for opportunities ingrowth industries like health care, making it even more importantfor anyone entering the field – or already working in it – to staycompetitive with an MBA.

To learn more about MBA programs, visit www.daniels.du.edu.