Scariest places for people of color in NOLA

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It’s that time of year — the leaves are falling, it’s too cold to get away with wearing just a swimsuit to the darty and Netflix has finally updated its selection of scary movies. So, in anticipation of Halloween, we curated a list of the spookiest places to visit in the area — free of charge! As broke college students, it’s not easy to spend upwards of $20 on a ghost tour that might not even scare you. But we guarantee you — these will.

Hugo Fajardo | Senior Staff Artist

The Boot Bar and Grill

You don’t know how many times you’ll hear white people scream the N-word on any given night. And when the DJ plays “Freaky Friday” feat. Chris Brown by Lil Dicky? Prepare for your soul to leave your body in a way that no “haunted New Orleans” tour will ever succeed to cause.

The Ninth Ward

Visit this neighborhood if you want to be reminded of how inadequate the federal response is to low-income, minority-populated neighborhoods affected by national disasters.

The Civil War Museum (formerly known as the Confederate Museum)

Despite being centered on the famed Civil War, the museum, boasting plenty of confederate artifacts, makes no mention of slavery. It also contains a large collection of Jefferson Davis memorabilia, the one and only President of the Confederate States. We’re not saying he haunts the place, but we’re also not not saying he haunts it.

A diversity and inclusion workshop

When everyone else is white.

The Kappa Alpha house

The Kappa Alpha Order’s spiritual founder is Robert E. Lee, a commander of the Confederate Army.

KA also shares historical connections to white supremacy. Historically, Kappa Alpha has been  sympathetic to and supportive of the KKK’s cause of maintaining white supremacy. Kappa Alpha was founded to promote “Southern” values, including white supremacy. One of Kappa Alpha’s founders praised the role of the KKK in maintaining Southern culture as defined in the pre-Civil War era.

More recently, in anticipation of their “Old South” formal, Kappa Alpha constructed a wall of sandbags in front of their off-campus house tagged “Make America Great Again” and “Trump” – ironically, they claimed.

The majority of your classes

You’re lucky if there’s more than 15 people of color in your 200 person lecture.

Tulane University as whole

Its establishment was funded by profiters of slaveryvarious buildings on campus, such as Gibson Hall, are named after plantation owners and avid supporters of segregation, and the university is built on a former plantation. Spooky!