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Everett Phelps

Former lovers of Caroline Polachek, beware. The woman is out forrevenge. The pop siren and her partner Patrick Wimberly, whotogether form the Brooklyn, N.Y. electro-pop group Chairlift,recently released their second full-length album, Something, onYoung Turks Records. The album diverges from the band’s 2008 debut,Does You Inspire You, with a quick turn away from the mainstream.Chairlift first gained fame for their iPod Nano-jingle “Bruises”and an unexpected MTV Video Music Award for their video of “EvidentUtensil.”

With the help of producers Dan Carey and Alan Moulder, alongwith the sounds of Patrick Wimberly (who helped produce DasRacist’s “Relax”), Chairlift stepped into a futuristic,synth-pounding haze. Wimberly and company lay down searing,stinging instrumentals as Polachek coos with her lofty, etherealvoice. On Does You Inspire You, Polachek muses over lovers paintingher “black and blue,” but Something is her way of hitting back withpoetic lyricism. On the opener, “Sidewalk Safari,” she squashes oldlovers with her car. On the next track, “Wrong Opinion,” shereminisces, “I left my guts out on the table, but you said ‘No.'”Clearly, the woman is hurt, and she takes the listener on anexploration of love and relationships, accentuating the strengthshe gets from the pain. “Weakness wins if weakness shows,” sheadvises on “Cool as a Fire.”

There is no giddy pop single on Something. It sounds like a moremature piece from the Brooklyn outfit. The album’s first single,”Amanaemonesia,” is no TV commercial soundtrack but a look into amind so torn it had to make up its own condition. Wimberly slowsthe pace of the album to a steady simmer, as Polachek pours out herheart and guns and guts and everything else for offenders andlisteners alike to witness.