The Tulane Hullabaloo

Discover Weekly: “Riptide,” “Highway to Hell,” “Wake Up,” “Roses,” “1-800-273-8255”

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New music recommendations can be hard to come by. Whether you’re a hipster, rock enthusiast, pop punk, raver or metalhead, the search for new artists and tunes is perpetual and insatiable. If you’re in the market for more study tunes, workout jams or feel-good bops, look no further – The Hullabaloo’s got you.

If you’re a fan of “Riptide” by Vance Joy, you’ll vibe with “Don’t Ask Me Why” by Great Caesar.

“Riptide” is one of those songs that everyone knows and enjoys (or at least tolerates), largely due to its mid-tempo crossover appeal. If you’re one of these people, Great Caesar’s folksy charm will seduce you in mere moments. “Don’t Ask Me Why” incorporates upbeat acoustic guitars with atmospheric harmonies and a refreshingly expressive give-and-take between the band’s dual lead singers to form a song that tells a moving story both lyrically and musically. Its versatility makes it perfect for chill wine nights, productive study sessions or gazing out the window wistfully.

If you rock out to AC/DC’s “Highway to Hell,” you should give The Struts’ “Kiss This” a listen.

Looking for new driving jams? Consider yourself warned: this is a song that’ll make you drive triple the speed limit. Few bands have managed to translate the brazenly over-the-top classic rock style of Queen, Led Zeppelin and AC/DC into the modern era as genuinely, organically, or successfully as The Struts. The unrelentingly fast-paced hype and stadium-sized chorus of “Kiss This,” for instance, are testaments to the band’s timelessness. The Struts’ larger-than-life persona, spearheaded by its swaggering, powerhouse frontman Luke Spiller, is only augmented by the overpoweringly bombastic hype its songs exude.

If you dig “Wake Up” by Arcade Fire, indulge yourself with “The Agony and the Ecstasy” by ROMANS.

For you pretentious indie gurus out there, ROMANS’ genre-bending rock opera power ballad “The Agony and the Ecstasy” will be right up your alley. The track combines a tasteful guitar hook with delicate piano, crooning horns and unabashedly sentimental vocals to create an emotional and melodic sonic experience that’ll prove irresistible to indie fans of all musical pedigrees. And don’t worry about the song being popular or mainstream or anything – it’s as obscure as it gets, with fewer than 250,000 streams on Spotify.

If “Roses” by The Chainsmokers is your jam, get hyped to “Lies” by Jane XØ.

If you live on planet Earth, there’s a pretty good chance that you’ve heard at least a few of The Chainsmokers radio-friendly electro-pop tunes. Whether it’s ironic or not, most everyone has a soft spot for the NYC duo and their earworm beats and drops. If you’re looking for something similar that’s, well, less mainstream, Jane XØ and her soulful EDM tracks could be your next obsession. Jane XØ’s music is somewhat anomalous within a genre oversaturated with female vocalists; not only does the singer weave an uncommon level of introspectiveness into her lyrics, but she delivers these lyrics with an emotional vulnerability that only heightens the impact of her songs’ high-powered drops.

If Logic’s “1-800-273-8255” is one of your faves, you’ll love Watsky’s “Talking to Myself.”

In terms of modern rap, few artists possess the same flair for cheeky irreverence as San Francisco-based rapper Watsky. Often incorporating elements of rock, jazz, and spoken word within his mold-breaking brand of hip hop, Watsky’s music is unique both lyrically and sonically. “Talking to Myself” appeals to casual and not-so-casual listeners alike, featuring solid verses and a memorable chorus, as well as reflective lyrics addressing heavy existential themes regarding success, happiness and inspiration.

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Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans
Discover Weekly: “Riptide,” “Highway to Hell,” “Wake Up,” “Roses,” “1-800-273-8255”