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  • TUA update

    News

    Student government to host spring elections this week

  • Tulane University removed Tonya Hansel as director of the doctor of social work program. Hansel remains a tenured professor.

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    Director of Tulane doctor of social work program removed

  • The New Orleans Book Festival at Tulane University is scheduled for Mar. 14-16.

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    Book Fest schedule features Stacey Abrams, Jake Tapper

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    ‘A huge step forward’: Plots earn Divine Nine recognition on campus

  • Over the span of five days, monks from the Drepung Gomang Monastery worked together in the meticulous creation of a sand mandala on the fifth floor of the Howard-Tilton Memorial Library. On Saturday morning, it was wiped away with several swipes of a paintbrush.

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    Peek into Tibetan Buddhism, from Howard-Tilton Memorial Library

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  • Its a bird, its a plane, its Green Wave Man

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    Meet Green Wave Man: Tulane’s only superfan

  • Lisa P. Jackson, Apple executive and the first Black administrator of the EPA, came to Tulane to speak about her career path.

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    Apple executive Lisa Jackson speaks on career journey

  • The pop icon has come under scrutiny for her consistent attendance at Kansas City Chiefs games this season

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    Do NFL fans really hate Taylor Swift or do they hate women?

  • OPINION | Tenure: The last defense of professors’ constitutional rights 

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    OPINION | Tenure: The last defense of professors’ constitutional rights 

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    Arcade

    What can I do with my first college summer?

  • Club spotlight: Tulane Sports Business Conference

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    Club spotlight: Tulane Sports Business Conference

  • Dua Lipa turns back clock on ‘Training Season’

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    Dua Lipa turns back clock on ‘Training Season’

  • Pottery on display in the Newcomb Art Museum.

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    Newcomb Pottery shines light on Tulane’s history

  • OPINION | Could NOLA be more than four years of fun?

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    OPINION | Could NOLA be more than four years of fun?

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Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

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Tulane welcomes most diverse incoming class in history

Students celebrate after convocation held in Devlin Fieldhouse as part of new student orientation. (Courtesy of Sabree Hill)

This fall, Tulane University boasts — yet again — its most diverse incoming class. The class of 2027 hails from 49 states and territories, 36 countries and 41% of students identify as a person of color, up 38% from last year.

The admissions cycle also reflects shifting values from the administration, as fewer students were accepted early decision to increase accessibility to lower-income applicants. This change raised the acceptance rate from 8.5% for the class of 2026 to 13% for 2027. Tulane still ranks among the colleges with the lowest acceptance rate nationally. 

“It became clear that we need to save more room in the first-year class for students who are not ready to commit — especially financially — to a university so early in their high school career,” Shawn Abbott, vice president for enrollment management and dean of admissions, said. “While our financial aid offers are extremely competitive for all rounds of admission, it can still be intimidating for families to make such a firm commitment to a university without seeing other offers of admission and financial aid during the Early Decision admission process.” 

Abbott has previously emphasized the importance of improving socioeconomic diversity through scholarship allotment. In this effort, Tulane’s Office of Admission has continued to shift money away from merit to need-based scholarships, though both scholarships will continue to be offered indefinitely, according to Abbott. 

“Affordability shouldn’t be a barrier to having access to a Tulane education,” Director for Diversity Initiatives, Valencia Jones, said. “We will continue to increase recruitment engagement, establish partnerships with community-based organizations, and refine financial aid procedures to increase transparency and reduce barriers for students from modest income backgrounds.”  

This year, 9% of incoming students are Federal Pell Grant recipients from low-income backgrounds and 10% are first-generation college students, an increase from 7% last year. 

In terms of academics, the class of 2027 should have no problem adjusting to Tulane’s academic rigor, with an average ACT score of almost 33 and an average unweighted GPA of 3.7. Submitting ACT or SAT scores remained optional for the class of 2027 and the majority of students did not submit scores. 

The new students on campus will not remedy the gender imbalance, as 64% of incoming students’ legal sex is female. On campus, 61% of all current students identify as female. The class of 2027 also welcomes the highest number of LGBTQ+ students to campus in history, at 13%. 

“This is simply a reality that mirrors a national trend where women are applying and enrolling in larger numbers at most highly selective colleges and universities,” Abbott said. “We have a much larger female-identifying applicant pool so it’s not surprising that more of them are represented in this year’s class.” 

Second only to Louisiana with 230 committed students, the Northeast is the next most represented region, followed by the South Atlantic and the Pacific West. 

“All of these numbers represent new admissions records for us and reflect our commitment to attracting a diverse community of outstanding scholars,” President Michael Fitts said in a campuswide email. “The opportunity to live, learn and engage with others whose experiences differ from our own is a cornerstone of higher education, leading to innovation, improved decision-making, and civil discourse.”

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