Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

Navigate Left
  • Green Wave baseball heads to the Corvallis regional after winning back-to-back conference championships

    Baseball

    Green Wave Baseball wins back-to-back conference championships, will play in Corvallis regional

  • Available supplies include, but are not limited to, syringes, tourniquets, cookers and other paraphernalia, provided to cut down on sharing within the community.

    City

    Harm reduction in New Orleans, from pavement up

  • From blues to Cajun cuisine: the best of Jazz Fest 2024

    Arcade

    From blues to Cajun cuisine: the best of Jazz Fest 2024

  • Police have found two video cameras in campus bathrooms in recent months and arrested one former employee but said the cases do not appear to be connected.

    News

    Faculty, students deliver letters condemning Tulane’s response to pro-Palestinian encampment

  • Screenshot

    Letter to the Editor

    Letter to the Editor | Tulane faculty letter concerning campus protest

  • Jack Zinsser shows face.

    Arcade

    Helluva Hubbalagoo

  • Winners announced: Arcade A+ Awards

    Arcade

    Winners announced: Arcade A+ Awards

  • Michael Pratt was selected by the Green Bay Packers with the 245th overall pick in the seventh round of the 2024 NFL draft.

    Football

    Pratt, Jackson, others find landing spots in NFL

  • Letter from the Editor | In good hands

    Letter to the Editor

    Letter from the Editor | In good hands

  • Zion Williamsons injury in the NBA play-in was the final nail in the coffin for the New Orleans Pelicans season.

    Basketball

    Remembering New Orleans Pelicans: October 2023 – April 2024

  • Participants of the 2024 Tulane Student Film Festival. Courtesy of the Film Festival.

    Arcade

    Tulane hosts third annual student film festival

  • OPINION | Final exams: Are we finally done with them?

    Views

    OPINION | Final exams: Are we finally done with them?

  • OPINION | Science or not: Rethinking core curriculum

    Views

    OPINION | Science or not: Rethinking core curriculum

  • Screenshot

    Views

    Letter to the Editor | Silent killer: Why World Malaria Day matters

  • Police stand in front of protesters early Wednesday morning.

    City

    Pro-Palestinian protesters demand charges be dropped after police sweep at Tulane

Navigate Right
Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

flytedesk: Box (In-Story)
flytedesk (In-Story | Box)
flytedesk (Sidebar | Half Page)

Tulane adjusts admission policy to SCOTUS affirmative action ruling

The Supreme Court declared affirmative action policies unconstitutional for disadvantaging certain students based on race. (Jude Papillion)

The Supreme Court reversed its position on affirmative action on Jun. 29, ruling that the affirmative action policies of Harvard University and University of North Carolina were unconstitutional under the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th amendment. Tulane University has assembled a group of experts to inform its policy going forward, according to President Mike Fitts. 

The Supreme Court based its decision on the fact that the schools’ affirmative action policies disadvantaged certain students, and lacked “meaningful end points,” according to a report from the Congressional Research Service.  

According to the majority’s opinion, college admission programs may still consider an applicant’s race in the discussion of their personal experiences with discrimination or otherwise, but cannot use race itself as a deciding factor. 

“The student must be treated based on [their] experiences as an individual – not on the basis of race,” according to the majority opinion. 

Tulane’s admissions process included affirmative action programs for both higher education and employment. Fitts circulated a statement to the Tulane community when the decision was announced but the university has not explicitly detailed ways the admissions process will change following the new regulations. 

Tulane will “continue to welcome and support students, faculty and staff from the widest range of cultural and educational backgrounds,” Fitts said in the email. “Experts from across the university [have] been meeting regularly and that their efforts will inform our practices to ensure we continue to attract the best and brightest students.”

Tulane’s admission criteria and processes are tailored accordingly to comply with the law,” Valencia Jones, Tulane Admissions Director of Diversity Initiatives, said. “We practice a holistic, individualistic, and contextual review to evaluate multiple, intersecting factors-academic, non-academic.” 

Leave a Comment

Donate to The Tulane Hullabaloo
$1000
$1000
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tulane University. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

Donate to The Tulane Hullabaloo
$1000
$1000
Contributed
Our Goal