Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

Navigate Left
  • Green Wave baseball heads to the Corvallis regional after winning back-to-back conference championships

    Baseball

    Green Wave Baseball wins back-to-back conference championships, will play in Corvallis regional

  • Available supplies include, but are not limited to, syringes, tourniquets, cookers and other paraphernalia, provided to cut down on sharing within the community.

    City

    Harm reduction in New Orleans, from pavement up

  • From blues to Cajun cuisine: the best of Jazz Fest 2024

    Arcade

    From blues to Cajun cuisine: the best of Jazz Fest 2024

  • Police have found two video cameras in campus bathrooms in recent months and arrested one former employee but said the cases do not appear to be connected.

    News

    Faculty, students deliver letters condemning Tulane’s response to pro-Palestinian encampment

  • Screenshot

    Letter to the Editor

    Letter to the Editor | Tulane faculty letter concerning campus protest

  • Jack Zinsser shows face.

    Arcade

    Helluva Hubbalagoo

  • Winners announced: Arcade A+ Awards

    Arcade

    Winners announced: Arcade A+ Awards

  • Michael Pratt was selected by the Green Bay Packers with the 245th overall pick in the seventh round of the 2024 NFL draft.

    Football

    Pratt, Jackson, others find landing spots in NFL

  • Letter from the Editor | In good hands

    Letter to the Editor

    Letter from the Editor | In good hands

  • Zion Williamsons injury in the NBA play-in was the final nail in the coffin for the New Orleans Pelicans season.

    Basketball

    Remembering New Orleans Pelicans: October 2023 – April 2024

  • Participants of the 2024 Tulane Student Film Festival. Courtesy of the Film Festival.

    Arcade

    Tulane hosts third annual student film festival

  • OPINION | Final exams: Are we finally done with them?

    Views

    OPINION | Final exams: Are we finally done with them?

  • OPINION | Science or not: Rethinking core curriculum

    Views

    OPINION | Science or not: Rethinking core curriculum

  • Screenshot

    Views

    Letter to the Editor | Silent killer: Why World Malaria Day matters

  • Police stand in front of protesters early Wednesday morning.

    City

    Pro-Palestinian protesters demand charges be dropped after police sweep at Tulane

Navigate Right
Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

flytedesk: Box (In-Story)
flytedesk (In-Story | Box)
flytedesk (Sidebar | Half Page)

Students gather for vigil mourning Palestinian deaths

Students+gathered+on+Wednesday+for+a+vigil+to+mourn+Palestinian+deaths.
Lillian Foster
Students gathered on Wednesday for a vigil to mourn Palestinian deaths.

Tulane University students gathered in Pocket Park outside of the Lavin-Bernick Center on Wednesday for a vigil to mourn the deaths of Palestinians, Israelis, foreign nationals, humanitarian relief providers and journalists.

Tulane4Palestine and Students Organizing Against Racism promoted the event on Instagram. Tulane4Palestine is not a registered student organization and did not sponsor the event, Tulane spokesperson Mike Strecker said. He said the vigil was sponsored by an individual student and was restricted to only Tulane students, faculty and staff. 

The Instagram post said the vigil was meant to be a “space for Tulane students facing the tremendous loss of friends and family to grieve and mourn together.”

Senior Vonne Crandell attended the vigil and said that as an African American, he sees his struggle reflected in Palestine. 

“I hope [this vigil] stirs the humanity in some of our students,” Crandell said. “I hope they see the humanity of people; I hope they’re able to see that their grief isn’t the only one that exists and they can exist together. I hope that they see that this comes from hurt.”

Students read poems, sang songs and read anonymous statements from students and faculty about the hardships they’ve dealt with on campus since the war started Oct. 7.

Senior Anya Sastry described the vigil as necessary during a “tense climate on campus.”

“In the face of people who try and instigate hate, and in the face of people who try and create more divisions, there is common humanity to be found,” Sastry said. “It’s super important to be able to come together and find common ground over a common humanity that recognizes that every life is so important, no matter the color of their skin or what religion they practice.”

Sophomore Maddy Williams said she feels upset about how Tulane handled the Israel-Palestine situation on campus.

“I feel like there’s a very dominant narrative on Tulane’s campus,” Williams said. “I feel like Tulane administration is really backing that up without challenging the ideals that are going along with that. I’ve seen a lot of suppressive language and enforcement and reaction to students expressing their grief and support towards what’s happening in Palestine. That’s made me feel upset.”

Students at the vigil signed names of Palestinian children who have been killed. (Lillian Foster)

In statements in October and November, the school said it stands firmly against Islamophobia, antisemitism and racism. Before a march for Palestine last month, Tulane heightened security and vowed to hold anyone who grew violent accountable. Campus leaders said they took those steps to protect students’ free speech rights. 

“Our heightened security measures are not meant to thwart free expression and peaceful debate,” a statement signed by President Michael Fitts, Provost Robin Forman and Chief Operating Officer Patrick Norton, said. “Rather they are designed to protect our campus community and all peaceful demonstrators.”

Sophomore Paige Halverstadt wanted to go to the vigil to show support for the Palestinian community on campus. 

“I’ve seen Palestinian students on campus feel very ignored by the Tulane community,” Halverstadt said. “I wanted to come today and pay my respects to all the lives that have been lost. I think the Tulane administration, as well as the student body, has been less accommodating and suppressive to Palestinian and Arab student voices. I don’t think they’ve given their students the support they need right now.”

Crandell said the university has handled the Israel-Palestine situation “poorly.”

“From the very first message that was sent out, it was very clear to me who wasn’t welcome on campus,” Crandell said. He said he has heard the word terrorist thrown at students, and that others have been doxxed and followed home. “The university has done nothing to protect these students or recognize their pain,” Crandell said. 

Tulane has encouraged students who witness or become victims of harassment to fill out a concerns report or call student affairs. 

Williams said events like vigils are essential for students.

“I’m really glad I came,” Williams said. “It was really meaningful to listen to everybody talk. The poems were amazing. It is just such a needed experience in times like these for people to gather together and recognize that you’re not alone.”

Leave a Comment

Donate to The Tulane Hullabaloo
$1000
$1000
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tulane University. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

Donate to The Tulane Hullabaloo
$1000
$1000
Contributed
Our Goal