Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

Navigate Left
  • A student found a small video camera in a shower located on the sixth floor of the Butler dormitory.

    News

    Student discovers ‘small video camera’ in Butler shower, TUPD says

  • A student found a small video camera in a shower located on the sixth floor of the Butler dormitory.

    News

    Governor declares state of emergency over police shortage

  • Photo by the Tulane University Vietnamese Association

    Arcade

    How Tulanians celebrated Lunar New Year 2024

  • basketball

    Basketball

    Tulane men’s basketball’s struggles continue

  • The 2024 baseball season is officially underway

    Baseball

    Rasmussen, Welch lead Green Wave to start 2024 baseball season

  • OPINION | Love New Orleans after Mardi Gras

    Views

    OPINION | Love New Orleans after Mardi Gras

  • OPINION | That’s all, folks: Warner Bros. Discovery chooses capital over cinema

    Views

    OPINION | That’s all, folks: Warner Bros. Discovery chooses capital over cinema

  • Sika Dagbovie-Mullins, Joan Morgan and Regis M. Fox speak on a panel at the conference.

    News

    Tulane hosts 5th Biennial Black Women’s Health Conference

  • According to the Earth Island Journal, When the parade season ended in 2014, the New Orleans city government spent nearly $1.5 million to pick up about 1,500 tons of Mardi Gras-induced waste, consisting mostly of beads.

    News

    Poisonous plastic: Toxic truth about Mardi Gras beads

  • Graphic by Shivani Bondada

    Arcade

    ‘Nimona’: Animated revolution in LGBTQ+ love, identity

  • OPINION | Traditional grading scales need reform, now

    Views

    OPINION | Traditional grading scales need reform, now

  • A Philadelphia native, Moffa never saw New Orleans in her long-term plan. “I ended up staying in New Orleans for 14 years,” she said. “I always say my heart is still there. My husband and I just got married there in October.”

    News

    Nina Moffa alumni spotlight

  • Professors and students, like junior Isabelle Smith showed their love for New Orleans by joining in on the parade festivities.

    News

    ‘I really felt one with the city’: Professors, students reflect on parades

  • Louisiana musicians honored at 2024 Grammy Awards

    Arcade

    Louisiana musicians honored at 2024 Grammy Awards

  • Cracking codes: Synbio club trailblazes CRISPR research

    Arcade

    Cracking codes: Synbio club trailblazes CRISPR research

Navigate Right
Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

flytedesk: Box (In-Story)
flytedesk (In-Story | Box)
flytedesk (Sidebar | Half Page)

Louisiana gains second majority-Black congressional district

The Louisiana state Legislature passed a new congressional district map, creating the state’s second majority-Black district. (“Louisiana State Capitol Building” by Chrismiceli, Wikimedia Commons)

On Friday, the Louisiana Legislature passed a new congressional map that formed a second majority Black congressional district.

In November 2023, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed that the congressional voting map passed by Louisiana’s Republican-controlled state legislature illegally suppressed the vote of Black Louisianians. 

The new map was approved by the legislature on Jan. 19, following a year-long appeals process and a Supreme Court decision that forced Alabama to produce a new map based on comparable racial discrimination.

Under the previous map, Louisiana had six congressional districts. Five of those districts were majority-white, despite Louisiana being nearly one-third Black.  

A new 6th Congressional District will be drawn as a thin strip through the middle of the state, from Shreveport to Baton Rouge. The percentage of Black voters in Rep. Troy Carter’s district, the second, will drop from 60% to 51%. The 6th Congressional District will now be 53% Black.

Republican Rep. Garret Graves sits in the current 6th Congressional District and appears likely to lose his seat. Graves spoke out against Gov. Jeff Landry as he campaigned for governor last year.

However, this new map protects the heavily Republican districts of the U.S. House Speaker Mike Johnson, Majority Leader Steve Scalise and members Clay Higgins and Julia Letlow. According to Conservative Political Action Conference, these representatives are all rated as more conservative than Graves. Of all the Republican members of Congress, Higgins is ranked the 50th most conservative and Johnson is 62nd. Graves is much farther behind at 167th. 

Gov. Landry, a Republican, has expressed support for the map, which targets the state’s least conservative Republican representative. However, as Louisiana’s attorney general from 2016 to 2024, he defended the old map, arguing it did not racially discriminate against Black Louisianians. 

Louisiana’s Supreme Court’s districts were last redrawn 25 years ago. In Louisiana, Supreme Court justices are elected by voters, not appointed by the governor. In a December letter, a majority of the court’s justices asked Landry to take the court’s redrawing into consideration. The justices also called for the creation of a second majority-Black district.

Leave a Comment

Donate to The Tulane Hullabaloo
$125
$1000
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tulane University. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

Donate to The Tulane Hullabaloo
$125
$1000
Contributed
Our Goal