Tulane sends false acceptance emails to 130 early decision applicants

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Tulane sends false acceptance emails to 130 early decision applicants

Courtesy of Tulane Public Relations

Courtesy of Tulane Public Relations

Courtesy of Tulane Public Relations

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130 early decision applicants received an email from Technology Services, offering admission to the class of 2021 and Tulane email addresses before the Office of Undergraduate Admission officially released decisions.

Tulane notified those accepted in the early decision process by midnight Thursday. None of the 130 students who received the email, however, received acceptance in the early admissions process.

Some were offered deferred admission for spring 2018 or were deferred to the pool of regular decision applicants. Tulane Admissions later contacted the applicants, telling them to disregard the Technology Services email.

“Tulane deeply regrets the confusion, anger, disappointment and frustration caused by this error,” Executive Director of Public Relations Michael Strecker said in a statement.

In a Tulane Admissions blog post titled “We Messed Up,” Director of Admission Jeff Schiffman said that he was regretful and considered possible options for the affected applicants.

“Many people have told me that we should just admit that population as it’s the right thing to do,” Schiffman said in the post. “In a perfect world, that would be true. But admitting an additional 130 students is much easier said than done and greatly throws off the size of the class. It simply can’t be done.”

According to the statement, the email was caused by a technical glitch that occurred while the technology team was switching software systems. The university is working on reviewing the error to ensure that it does not happen again.

“What Tulane has done is inexcusable and I offer those students, their families, their high school counselors and their communities a heartfelt apology,” Schiffman said in his blog post. “Tulane can do better and we will.”