Zeta Psi hosts second annual car bash to benefit Aishel House

Senior+Billy+Coombs%2C+cancer+survivor+and+Zeta+Psi+brother%2C+takes+a+sledgehammer+to+a+car+at+the+second+annual+Car+Bash.%C2%A0

Senior Billy Coombs, cancer survivor and Zeta Psi brother, takes a sledgehammer to a car at the second annual Car Bash. 

Emma Discher, Senior Staff Reporter

Zeta Psi fraternity hosted its second car bash event Sunday outside its house on Broadway Street. The event supports a Zeta Psi brother, Billy Coombs, who fought and beat cancer last year and the Aishel House where he stayed during his treatment.

Zeta Psi Philanthropy Chair Adam Kline planned the event with support from previous chair Billy Pavord, who planned the event last year. Kline said this year’s date was particularly important.

“It fell on an awesome date this year,” Kline said. “It was also the one-year anniversary of Billy Coombs stopping chemotherapy. Last year all the proceeds went to Billy Coombs’ family for medical expenses. This year we decided to take on the Aishel House which is the non-profit location that Billy stayed at during his treatment.”

Coombs expressed how much the Aishel House means to him.

“[The Aishel House] is an organization that offers subsidized housing to cancer patients near the Houston Medical Center,” Coombs said. “It’s walking distance right by the center and it’s where I stayed when I was there. For my first cycle I was 45 minutes driving way from the medical center and it was miserable because I had to come back after sitting in the hospital all day on chemo. I would have to pull over the car to get out and throw up sometimes. I think it’s a great cause.”

Kline said that though he does not have a fundraising total, they anticipated a lower amount of donations this year because Coombs is done with his therapy and the cause is not as personal. 

“I haven’t totaled everything up yet but I think we had a successful event and got the word out about the Aishel House and what they do,” Kline said.

Coombs said that he hopes the event becomes an annual occurrence. 

“It was a lot of fun hitting the car,” Coombs said. “It released my anger. I think it’s a good event to raise money for philanthropies and charity. I was having an absolute blast all day hanging out with everyone and watching them beat up the car.”

The event stood as a reminder to Coombs of the support that he has had throughout his cancer.

“This year that they did it again and for a charity that I care about means a lot,” Coombs said. “It goes to show you what a fraternity can be besides just partying. Just a year later looking back and seeing how I’ve had constant support from the time I found out about this cancer until now when I’m recovered is amazing.”