Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

Navigate Left
  • Available supplies include, but are not limited to, syringes, tourniquets, cookers and other paraphernalia, provided to cut down on sharing within the community.

    City

    Harm reduction in New Orleans, from pavement up

  • From blues to Cajun cuisine: the best of Jazz Fest 2024

    Arcade

    From blues to Cajun cuisine: the best of Jazz Fest 2024

  • Police have found two video cameras in campus bathrooms in recent months and arrested one former employee but said the cases do not appear to be connected.

    News

    Faculty, students deliver letters condemning Tulane’s response to pro-Palestinian encampment

  • Screenshot

    Letter to the Editor

    Letter to the Editor | Tulane faculty letter concerning campus protest

  • Jack Zinsser shows face.

    Arcade

    Helluva Hubbalagoo

  • Winners announced: Arcade A+ Awards

    Arcade

    Winners announced: Arcade A+ Awards

  • Michael Pratt was selected by the Green Bay Packers with the 245th overall pick in the seventh round of the 2024 NFL draft.

    Football

    Pratt, Jackson, others find landing spots in NFL

  • Letter from the Editor | In good hands

    Letter to the Editor

    Letter from the Editor | In good hands

  • Zion Williamsons injury in the NBA play-in was the final nail in the coffin for the New Orleans Pelicans season.

    Basketball

    Remembering New Orleans Pelicans: October 2023 – April 2024

  • Participants of the 2024 Tulane Student Film Festival. Courtesy of the Film Festival.

    Arcade

    Tulane hosts third annual student film festival

  • OPINION | Final exams: Are we finally done with them?

    Views

    OPINION | Final exams: Are we finally done with them?

  • OPINION | Science or not: Rethinking core curriculum

    Views

    OPINION | Science or not: Rethinking core curriculum

  • Screenshot

    Views

    Letter to the Editor | Silent killer: Why World Malaria Day matters

  • Police stand in front of protesters early Wednesday morning.

    City

    Pro-Palestinian protesters demand charges be dropped after police sweep at Tulane

  • A protester wearing a keffiyeh stands before police.

    City

    Tulane arrests 14 protesters, clears pro-Palestinian encampment

Navigate Right
Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

flytedesk: Box (In-Story)
flytedesk (In-Story | Box)
flytedesk (Sidebar | Half Page)

OPINION | 85 years of excellence: Prestige of Tulane naval program

NROTC provides military career preparation through coursework and physical training. (Taylor Fishman)

What is NROTC? Tulane’s Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps program provides invaluable opportunities and benefits to participating students. While enrollment has steadily increased over the years, the program still struggles with low enrollment and lack of student awareness. Increased student participation and backing from Tulane University could allow the NROTC program to thrive and serve both students and the United States.

NROTC gives students interested in military careers a head start through classes, training and practical experience. Midshipmen gain leadership, teamwork and other skills that prepare them to commission as officers or pursue civilian jobs after graduation. Additionally, NROTC scholarships make college more affordable by covering tuition, housing fees and textbooks in return for five years of service. 

Christian Allmon sought out Tulane’s NROTC program as a pathway to achieve his dream of becoming a Navy officer. Hailing from a modest background, Allmon knew his family would not be able to fully fund his college education. By earning a NROTC scholarship to Tulane, Allmon secured financial assistance for a school which provides training to join the world’s greatest fighting force. 

Now in his third year at Tulane, Allmon serves as the recruiting division officer in the NROTC program, motivating and recruiting fellow students to enroll. He says he is grateful for the opportunities NROTC has afforded him and hopes to see the program grow so that other ambitious midshipmen may benefit as well. This past summer, Allmon had the opportunity to experience life on an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer in Norfolk, Virginia. During his summer training deployment, Allmon was able to meet and work with expert naval personnel.  

With greater promotion of NROTC opportunities on campus, more students can reap benefits. Highlighting the program during recruitment events and new student orientation, as well as promoting classes about military culture and history, will boost participation. Current full-time freshmen and sophomore students can also apply to the NROTC and receive the full benefits of the program. 

In 2021, Tulane’s NROTC Unit received a top excellence award from the Department of Defense, which recognized the military department’s outstanding unit and host educational institution. According to President Mike Fitts, “Tulane has a rich and proud history of supporting our Reserve Officers Training Corps, dating back to 1938, with the formation of the Tulane NROTC,” and that this honor “exemplif[ies] the university’s call to service and elevate[s] our mission of educating the leaders of tomorrow.” 

Tulane’s NROTC has commissioned over 2,150 Navy and Marine Corps officers. Tulane NROTC also has numerous notable alumni and powerful women, such as Captain Jennifer Wilderman, who flew night operations in the Strait of Magellan and supported Operation Desert Fox. Additionally, General David Berger was appointed the 38th commandant of the Marine Corps and Colonel Douglas Hurley was one of the first astronauts for U.S. commercial space flights and commanded the SpaceX crew Dragon in 2020. Tulane’s support is seen as crucial to the education and training of top military leaders, and a top excellence award reflects the long history and pride Tulane has in its NROTC programs.

NROTC students complete physical training three times a week in addition to a weekly Wednesday Leadership Lab which conducts a close-order drill and training, such as operational security, nutrition and stress management. 

Dominic LaPata spent six weeks in Quantico, Virginia, training at the Marine Corps Officer Candidates School. LaPata will commission as a Marine Corps officer in May of 2024. Due to LaPata’s experience in the Russian department at Tulane, he hopes to utilize his degree in the Marine Corps. NROTC members Jacob Fontenot and Logan Bartels agreed that the ability to be a college student and have a career path set out for you post-graduation “takes out the worry.” The unit also provides professional development such as leadership training and presentation skills, while also building confidence. Fontenot selected courses in Tulane’s NROTC building — including Leadership & Management and Naval Ops Analysis — that taught him valuable skills to become a military officer.

By growing student membership and expanding institutional support, Tulane’s NROTC program can better prepare midshipmen while providing the Marine Corps with motivated junior officers. With more resources dedicated to outreach and recruitment, Tulane can attract promising candidates who may have overlooked the school previously. By sharing their positive experiences, current midshipmen can then inspire prospective students to explore military service and Tulane’s educational opportunities.

Boosted enrollment and greater support benefits can strengthen the program and its students while also enriching the university’s community and the nation, which gains dedicated military leaders. 

Interested students can contact the Tulane NROTC Unit directly at (504) 247-1605.

Leave a Comment

Donate to The Tulane Hullabaloo
$1000
$1000
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tulane University. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

Donate to The Tulane Hullabaloo
$1000
$1000
Contributed
Our Goal