Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

Navigate Left
  • Available supplies include, but are not limited to, syringes, tourniquets, cookers and other paraphernalia, provided to cut down on sharing within the community.

    City

    Harm reduction in New Orleans, from pavement up

  • From blues to Cajun cuisine: the best of Jazz Fest 2024

    Arcade

    From blues to Cajun cuisine: the best of Jazz Fest 2024

  • Police have found two video cameras in campus bathrooms in recent months and arrested one former employee but said the cases do not appear to be connected.

    News

    Faculty, students deliver letters condemning Tulane’s response to pro-Palestinian encampment

  • Screenshot

    Letter to the Editor

    Letter to the Editor | Tulane faculty letter concerning campus protest

  • Jack Zinsser shows face.

    Arcade

    Helluva Hubbalagoo

  • Winners announced: Arcade A+ Awards

    Arcade

    Winners announced: Arcade A+ Awards

  • Michael Pratt was selected by the Green Bay Packers with the 245th overall pick in the seventh round of the 2024 NFL draft.

    Football

    Pratt, Jackson, others find landing spots in NFL

  • Letter from the Editor | In good hands

    Letter to the Editor

    Letter from the Editor | In good hands

  • Zion Williamsons injury in the NBA play-in was the final nail in the coffin for the New Orleans Pelicans season.

    Basketball

    Remembering New Orleans Pelicans: October 2023 – April 2024

  • Participants of the 2024 Tulane Student Film Festival. Courtesy of the Film Festival.

    Arcade

    Tulane hosts third annual student film festival

  • OPINION | Final exams: Are we finally done with them?

    Views

    OPINION | Final exams: Are we finally done with them?

  • OPINION | Science or not: Rethinking core curriculum

    Views

    OPINION | Science or not: Rethinking core curriculum

  • Screenshot

    Views

    Letter to the Editor | Silent killer: Why World Malaria Day matters

  • Police stand in front of protesters early Wednesday morning.

    City

    Pro-Palestinian protesters demand charges be dropped after police sweep at Tulane

  • A protester wearing a keffiyeh stands before police.

    City

    Tulane arrests 14 protesters, clears pro-Palestinian encampment

Navigate Right
Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

flytedesk: Box (In-Story)
flytedesk (In-Story | Box)
flytedesk (Sidebar | Half Page)

Cowboy Carter explores past music tradition while creating its own

Cowboy+Carter+explores+past+music+tradition+while+creating+its+own
Mylie Bluhm

“This ain’t a Country album. This is a “Beyoncé” album,” Pop’s most influential star declared 10 days prior to the release of her newest album, “Cowboy Carter.” This latest endeavor, succeeding 2022’s “RENAISSANCE,” tackles the country genre with the inclusion of signature Beyoncé artistry. After all, Knowles-Carter hasn’t been known as one to stay trapped within the limits of pop music. 

“This album has been over five years in the making. It was born out of an experience that I had years ago where I did not feel welcomed … and it was very clear that I wasn’t,” the singer-songwriter wrote in a March 19 Instagram post, “The criticisms I faced when I first entered the genre forced me to propel past the limitations that were put on me. act ii is a result of challenging myself, and taking my time to bend and blend genres together to create this body of work.”

This deconstruction of genre endows Cowboy Carter with its most intrinsic “Beyoncé” quality: multidimensionality. Unafraid of samples and interpolation, Knowles-Carter urges her audience to ingest her work and the history that led to its publication within the modern context. Drawing from trailblazing Black artists such as Chuck Berry, up-and-coming Black country artists like Tanner Adell and Brittney Spencer, centuries-old year old arias like “Caro Mio Bien” and iconic female singers such as Patsy Cline, Nancy Sinatra and Dolly Parton, Beyoncé weaves a tapestry of strength, heritage, femininity and independence. Knowles-Carter strives to demonstrate the universality of these values, and therefore her music. 

She supports this refusal of categorization in various moments, such as an introductory quip by famed Black country singer Linda Martell in “SPAGHETTII,” teasing the unnecessary limitations falsely drawn by the concept of genre. However, no other refusal is more on-the-nose than that of “AMERIICAN REQUIEM,” the album’s opening track. In the second verse of the song, Knowles-Carter sings: “The grandbaby of a moonshine man / Gadsden, Alabama / Got folk down in Galveston, rooted in Louisiana / Used to say I spoke too country / And the rejection came, said I wasn’t country ‘nough / Said I wouldn’t saddle up, but / If that ain’t country, tell me what is?”

“AMERIICAN REQUIEM” introduces the album’s themes of rejecting stereotypes while also appearing to address the same unwanted experience Knowles-Carter referenced in her Instagram post. Though Knowles-Carter has never linked the events specifically, fans speculate this “rejection” was the backlash faced for her divisive 2016 performance of “Daddy Lessons” at the Country Music Awards with The Chicks. Thousands online were enraged at the duet, claiming that Beyoncé did not represent the genre and so should not be performing on its highest stage. Other commenters argued her invalidity solely because of racism. Co-director of the Black Opry, Tanner Davenport, was present in the audience for the performance and recalled hearing a woman in the row in front of him yell, “Get that black b—ch off the stage.”

“Cowboy Carter” responds to the racialization of country music towards whiteness in the modern day by extracting the core values of the genre and placing them within the context of the multi-racial traditions under which the genre was created. Songs such as “PROTECTOR,” “MY ROSE” and “FLAMENCO” draw upon the beauty, support and strength found within the family unit. Knowles-Carter’s reworking of the Dolly Parton classic, “JOLENE,” stresses the importance of loyalty in relationships. The sprawling story “DAUGHTER” recognizes the importance of nostalgia and storytelling in the creation of a compelling narrative. Co-lead single “16 CARRIAGES” attributes hard work and humility in realizing success. “AMERICAN REQUIIEM” and “YA YA” proclaim Beyoncé’s heritage as distinctly Southern, distinctly American.

These home-grown American themes have roused the support of a nation, placing “Cowboy Carter” in the No. 1 spot on Billboard’s Hot 200 as well as No. 1 on Billboard’s Top Country albums, becoming the first Black woman ever to do so. It is no doubt that within “Cowboy Carter,” Knowles-Carter delivers a successful homage to the pioneers of the past while paving the way for a new, unbounded landscape of music.

Leave a Comment

Donate to The Tulane Hullabaloo
$1000
$1000
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tulane University. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

Donate to The Tulane Hullabaloo
$1000
$1000
Contributed
Our Goal