The Tulane Hullabaloo

‘Hers, Theirs, Ours’ offers intersectional alternative to Vagina Monologues

'Hers, Theirs, Ours' offers intersectional alternative to Vagina Monologues

Lauren Flowers, Intersections Editor

April 10, 2019

“Hers, Theirs, Ours” is an original, Tulane community-created production fighting gender-based violence against women-identifying and non-binary individuals. A relatively new production, “Hers, Theirs, Ours” exists to unite these individuals across Tulane’s campus and provide a safe space for th...

Eden, like the garden

Adelaide Basco | Art Director

Eric Charles, Contributing Writer

February 28, 2019

There is a place where one must travel to find love. This is not a home. It is a secret garden: constructed by knobby hands, hidden from unknown antagonists. I’ve been gone for a year, returned, then left again. A special person has an everlasting place in my heart. She’s within hundreds of ...

Intersectional Confessional: I wish you felt how I felt

Intersectional Confessional: I wish you felt how I felt

Eric Charles, Staff Writer

January 31, 2019

Margaux Armfield | Staff Artist I wish you felt how I felt. I first came to Tulane on an unofficial visit for football. I was excited about the new atmosphere in contrast to where I’m from: a place that instead loves itself for a long-standing relationship with crime and shortened life spans, ...

The bodies we live in: poems from the margins

The bodies we live in: poems from the margins

Canela López, Ella Helmuth, Xulhaz Mannan, and Zahra Saifudeen

April 19, 2018

Brown Love | Canela López Our humanity is fleeting. Together, it builds, grows. Our ancestors chained, eradicated, exterminated. But we thrive. Humanity stripped, bodies attacked, existence devalued. But we thrive. There are no devils in our bed. Safe haven, built of white sheets, soft pillows, w...

Rhyme Verses Rhythm aims to engage attendees, recruit members at poetry slam

poetry

Taylor DeMulling, Staff Reporter

November 16, 2017

It's an autumn evening, early in the fall semester. The year is 2014. A young man naively climbs up onstage at a poetry slam in a last-ditch effort to impress the articulate, well-educated woman of his dreams. His delivery, though shaky at first, transitions into a passionate spoken word piece tackling religion, the brevity of life and America's sweetheart,...

Poetry at the Movies: Ramblings of a Mixed Kid

Poetry at the Movies: Ramblings of a Mixed Kid

Alexis Martin, Contributing Writer

March 10, 2017

I do not understand. To be driven from your home. Stripped of your humanity. After all, "You knew better." To hate is to be taught to hate   "Knowing" weighs heavily. And heavier still, The safety of the souls we hold dearest That I can not think For myself But for...

“They didn’t tell me”

Kristen Munguia, Contributing Writer

February 16, 2017

There's a lot of things that they didn't tell me. They didn't tell me that I'd be one of only a handful of students who look like me. They didn't tell me that student of color representation was only 20 percent of a whole populous. They didn't tell me that the friends that I have already made wou...

Kristen Munguia: “Brown”

Tulane brown

Kristen Munguia, Contributing Writer

January 28, 2017

I've never thought much about the color of my skin. See I've always been taught to only focus on what lies within.   The problem with the real world is, no one really listens. Different stories, different glasses, in all these different prescriptions.   I've come...