Former Wave standout Julius Warmsley enjoys Super Bowl as Seahawk

From 2010-13, Warmsley accumulated 102 tackles, 30.5 of which were for a loss, ranking No. 5 all-time in Tulane history. Warmsley also racked up 14.5 sacks, which ranks No. 6 on the Wave’s all-time list. 

Dara Tucker, Sports Reporter

Though the New Orleans Saints missed the playoffs this year, New Orleans was still well represented in Super Bowl XLIX. Former Tulane football defensive end Julius Warmsley is a member of the NFC champion Seattle Seahawks’ practice squad.

As part of the Seahawks’ 10-man practice squad, Warmsley did not suit up for the game. Warmsley said, however, that just being part of the team was an incredible learning experience. 

“Personally, I’m overwhelmed with the fact that I’m [with Seattle],” Warmsley said. “To even be a part of a team that is in the Super Bowl is a blessing because most NFL football players never even get a chance to go to the Super Bowl or even play in an NFC Championship.”

Warmsley played at St. Michael’s High School in Baton Rouge before he spent a year at the United States Military Academy Preparatory School. Warmsley then committed to play football at Tulane. 

From 2010-13, Warmsley accumulated 102 tackles, 30.5 of which were for a loss, ranking No. 5 all-time in Tulane history. Warmsley also racked up 14.5 sacks, which ranks No. 6 on the Wave’s all-time list. Warmsley earned first-team all-Conference USA honors during his senior season due to his strong performance.

“[Tulane] taught me the ropes, told me what to do and how to do it well,” Warmsley said. “I’m constantly trying to develop myself into a better player and person all together. Tulane helped instill those traits in me.”

Before he was joined Seattle, Warmsley faced adversity as a rookie. After going undrafted in the 2014 NFL Draft, he signed with the Houston Texans. Despite a solid performance in the preseason, he was cut before the regular season began.

Warmsley promptly signed with Seattle but fractured his hand and fell ill with mononucleosis, all in a span of one week. 

“At that time, [the Seahawks] could have cut me and said, `good riddance,'” Warmsley said. “Or they could have done what they did and say, `Hey, just stay on. We still want to have you around.’ I feel blessed for that.”

Despite watching Seattle’s 28-24 loss against the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl from the sidelines Feb. 2 in Glendale, Arizona, Warmsley said he was blessed to have the opportunity to be part of such a successful team. 

“I’m just super thankful for everything that has been placed in front of me because it could have been a totally different story,” Warmsley said.