Joy Theatre returns to rock with Mt. Joy

Olivia Tanaka-Kekai, Associate Arcade Editor

Mt. Joy (Olivia Tanaka-Kekai)

There’s a theme with the concerts I’ve been going to: I usually don’t know I’m going until a few days before. When I saw George Clanton, I had eight hours notice. We thought we would miss the TV Girl show due to Hurricane Ida and then ended up at school again early. I saw Mt. Joy, despite being a sold-out show, by receiving tickets on Sunday night for the Tuesday show. 

Last Tuesday’s concert was the first one back at the Joy since closing in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Momentum was granted to Briston Maroney and Mt. Joy. The expectation to bring back the beauty of live music was not a small one. Success could have been easily fumbled. 

It wasn’t. 

My guess is that the concert was the first that many had been to for over a year. Throngs of people packed in the general admission pit with the seating area in the mezzanine filled as well. Excitement buzzed through the air.

Mt. Joy has dedicated fans: the people standing in front of us had followed them for the last few stops on their tour. We only met because we were all pushing our way to the front. Dedication saw dedication. 

However, I got my first taste of the excitement before even arriving at the venue. Since I had two tickets, I knew that I needed to bring one of my friends who had been talking about this show since it was first announced. 

Kate is a much bigger fan than I am. And yet, being there with her and other hardcore fans made me feel as connected to the music as they were. The song that I knew the best, “Cardinal,” is about being homesick. Several of the band members are from Pennsylvania like me, something that hit me while I was swept up in the emotion of the crowd screaming the words to “Cardinal.” 

In that moment, I understood why people were so compelled to shout emotional lyrics into the abyss of a crowd of strangers. Their music pulled heartstrings. Ultimately, that’s what a good band does well: even when you feel like crying while singing a song, you’re still having the time of your life.