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  • Students, faculty and alumni gathered on the academic quad on Friday to start digging the new NPHC plots, marking a new beginning for Black greek organizations.

    News

    ‘A huge step forward’: Plots earn Divine Nine recognition on campus

  • Over the span of five days, monks from the Drepung Gomang Monastery worked together in the meticulous creation of a sand mandala on the fifth floor of the Howard-Tilton Memorial Library. On Saturday morning, it was wiped away with several swipes of a paintbrush.

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    Peek into Tibetan Buddhism, from Howard-Tilton Memorial Library

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  • Its a bird, its a plane, its Green Wave Man

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  • Lisa P. Jackson, Apple executive and the first Black administrator of the EPA, came to Tulane to speak about her career path.

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    Apple executive Lisa Jackson speaks on career journey

  • The pop icon has come under scrutiny for her consistent attendance at Kansas City Chiefs games this season

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  • OPINION | Tenure: The last defense of professors’ constitutional rights 

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    OPINION | Tenure: The last defense of professors’ constitutional rights 

  • Heres how you should spend your college summer.

    Arcade

    What can I do with my first college summer?

  • Club spotlight: Tulane Sports Business Conference

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    Club spotlight: Tulane Sports Business Conference

  • Dua Lipa turns back clock on ‘Training Season’

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    Dua Lipa turns back clock on ‘Training Season’

  • Pottery on display in the Newcomb Art Museum.

    Arcade

    Newcomb Pottery shines light on Tulane’s history

  • OPINION | Could NOLA be more than four years of fun?

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    OPINION | Could NOLA be more than four years of fun?

  • OPINION | To fight or flinch: Why Democrats need to get serious about 2024

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    OPINION | To fight or flinch: Why Democrats need to get serious about 2024

  • Tulane University archaeologists discovered a 1,700-year-old Maya king’s tomb in northeastern Guatemala.

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    Tulane archaeologist unearths ancient treasures from Maya tomb

  • The Green Wave will be featured in EA Sports College Football 25

    Football

    EA Sports: We’re ‘in the game’

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Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

Student newspaper serving Tulane University, Uptown New Orleans

The Tulane Hullabaloo

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OPINION | Journalism in landscape of misinformation

Gabe Darley

It is no question that the modern media landscape is evolving as news distribution continues to shift from print to digital mediums. As rapid digital media consumption becomes standard, it is increasingly difficult to evaluate the credibility of publications and sources alike. Given this misfortune, the power of traditionally accepted newspapers is being contested, and accusations of misinformation are multiplying. 

Journalistic correction practices are changing alongside the platforms on which articles are released. Publications like The New York Times change headlines of published articles without notifying readers, according to a 2022 University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School article. Publications do this to attract viewership and media attention, focusing on the word choices and content readers are drawn to. Further, newspapers have the ability to study digital algorithms and popular search engine inputs, and they take this information into consideration when forming new headlines and subtitles.

Many may be familiar with the accusation of misinformation against Facebook for circulating propaganda that aligns with biased opinions of viewers, despite the fact that this information is often false. Facebook has refused to limit the abilities of microtargeting, a digital tool that examines personal data to alter the content presented on one’s media platform. Further, Facebook apparently “doesn’t have the capacity or the legitimacy to act as arbiters of the truth,” according to an opinion  in the Washington Post

Even the content produced on online media platforms like Fizz can be mistaken for reliable news. Fizz is an application that operates as citizen journalism  and as a tool for community members to connect and share messages. It is easy for people to spread narratives on these kinds of platforms, and younger generations use these outlets to consume information frequently. Platforms like Fizz threaten the credibility of journalism and create an increased challenge for readers and media consumers to fact-check and verify legitimate sources. 

Undermining the state of journalism is a lack of global press freedom, as journalists continue to face attacks, hate and physical violence while reporting on critical events. Amidst violent conflict in Israel and Gaza, journalists and reporters risk their lives. According to an article published on Jan. 18 by The Guardian, 76 journalists “were Palestinians killed in Israeli strikes in Gaza, while three Lebanese citizens were also killed, and four Israelis were killed by Hamas in the 7 October attacks.” The article mentions that according to the press freedom advocacy organization, “Reporters Without Borders,” the existence of trustworthy, accurate journalism is being “eradicated in the Gaza Strip.” 

As Tulane University students, it is imperative to consider supporting and protecting organizations working to advocate for press freedom, which is what allows readers to make informed decisions, provides a diverse set of opinions and holds high powers accountable. An example of an organization like this is Reporters Without Borders, an organization dedicated to publishing news related to protection of media and journalistic rights. 

Another organization to consider is “Teens For Press Freedom,” a youth-led advocacy organization that distributes relevant news blasts, holds media literacy workshops and publishes press releases. It’s important to raise awareness about promoting accurate, trustworthy journalism, especially given ongoing international conflicts. 

It is critical that schools like Tulane emphasize education surrounding media literacy. This effort will help students navigate a world driven by so many forms of media and journalism and to understand the importance of protecting information that is accurate. 

Further, education about media literacy will help students discern what is reliable and gain a skill set to judge information presented to them. It is crucial to recognize the importance of discussion, dialogue and accountability, all achieved through uncensored, reliable journalism. On their own time, it’s important for students to consume media from a variety of publications to understand a variety of perspectives and make informed judgements.

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