Donovan Wolfington to rip the roof off Gasa Gasa

Band+members+Savannah+Sexton%2C+Christian+Baraks%2C+Matthew+Seferian+and+Neil+Berthier+pose+for+a+photo.

Band members Savannah Sexton, Christian Baraks, Matthew Seferian and Neil Berthier pose for a photo.

Ben Shooter, Staff Reporter

There are two sides to Freret street music venue Gasa Gasa.  There is Gasa Gasa itself, known for its odd ceiling illustrations and the mellow indie-rock bands it books, but there is also Sisters In Christ, Gasa Gasa’s in-house record store. The shop organizes shows of its own, and uses the same stage to bring a number of more aggressive acts to New Orleans.  At 6 p.m. Monday, Sisters in Christ will be at the controls, and punk-rock musician Jeff Rosenstock will wow audiences with melodic riffs, harsh chords and dynamic vocals.  The show is part of Rosenstock’s tour to promote his new album,“We Cool?,” which was released in March.

Opening for Rosenstock is local punk group Donovan Wolfington, whose individual members have already made an impact on the local scene in other bands like Pope and Sprawling. Donovan Wolfington is also about to release a new album of its own.

“We’ve been working on it for like 9 months and we’re going to play a lot of those songs,” Neil Berthier, the band’s charismatic guitarist and vocalist, said.  “It’s called ‘How to Treat the Ones You Love,’ and it’s the best thing we’ve put out for sure.”

While there are no samples of the album available to the public yet, the band cites a number of local influences, like Caddywhompus, Woozy and Native America, more established artists like Fountains of Wayne and a diverse array of genres.

“We’re all really into rap, and I don’t think that directly influenced the record, but I think it influenced a lot of the attitude,” Berthier said. “Like ‘fuck it, we’re us we’re just gonna be us and try a bunch of different shit out.’ It has to work the way we want it to work in order for it to work at all.”

While Neil Berthier plays drums in Sprawling and Matt Seferian plays guitar in Pope, Donovan Wolfington is somewhat of a different animal, with an edgier sound, and sure to create a raucous live environment.

“If you don’t come you’re missing out and you’re not cool and everyone hates you,” Berthier said.  “That’s why you have to go … We’re finally making songs we’ve always wanted to make for a really long time … We’re trying to make dreams come true, like working for the Make a Wish Foundation except we’re all the sick kid.”